Yehuda Moon Is Back for More Kickstarter Support

Rick Smith and Brian Griggs are back with Yehuda Moon & The Kickstand Comics : Volume 5, on Kickstater. Last time they well exceeded their project goal on Kickstarter with Volume 2 ,3, & 4 and hopefully will this time as well, helping to support this great online comic for years to come. So if you enjoy the comic please help fund this great Kickstater project. If you don’t already have the printed volumes of the comic, you can get them at different funding levels.

As I always say, if you haven’t heard of Yehuda Moon you can still get started reading them, as they are all online. Here is a link to the first strip. Yehuda Moon 01-22-2008

Yehuda Moon 01-22-2008

Last Months Trip to Crater Lake

Phantom Ship from Garfield PeakA month ago Angel and I took our first trip to Crater Lake. I haven’t had time to post anything about the trip or the photos until now. It started out as a nice simple trip to Crater Lake, stopping off in Oak Ridge along the way. Spending a nice time climbing Garfield Peak. Then ended the day with missing our one way home and having a super long adventure. Here is a good write up Angel wrote.

Writen by Angel,

On Austin’s day off, we decided to go on an adventure, and visit Crater Lake, the deepest lake in the United States, and one of the deepest in the world. Crater Lake was formed when Mount Mazama (a volcano) erupted and collapsed in on itself, forming a caldera, that over time filled up with water from rain and snow, and is now a national park. Crater Lake is sacred to the Klamath Native American tribe. No rivers flow into the lake, and none flow out, which is a major reason for the pureness of the water in Crater Lake. The eruption that formed Crater lake took place over 7,000 years ago, however there is still thermal activity present on the lake’s floor. There is a 1 in 300 chance of another eruption at Crater Lake occurring sometimes during the next 30 years. Interesting, the lake contains a couple of volcanic cinder cones, the most visible being Wizard Island. Boat tours to Wizard Island are available in the summer months (although Austin and I didn’t partake this time!).
We hiked Garfield Peak, which was 3 miles roundtrip, with a gain in elevation of over 8,000 feet! We stopped to rest a couple times, my favorite being when we found a rough rock bench in the shade of an evergreen tree, where I ate half of the sandwich I brought. I kept thinking we had made it to the top, but the trail went on forever. Despite the heat (I think it was 90 degrees the day we visited), there are still huge patches of snow present all over Crater Lake, that are shaded from the sun most of the day. I made a snowball and threw it into a puddle of melted snow. Eventually we made it to the top, and the view was gorgeous. We made our way back down, which was quicker than the way up.
Because cell phone service is spotty away from the cities, both of our cells phones suffered. Mine died while we were hiking because I didn’t think to turn it off, and Austin’s was nearly dead. We headed home around 7 o’clock. We got to see a gorgeous sunset over the hills, the whole sky was pink for a little while. We were going to stop for some gasoline, but were excited when we saw that we could just make it into town with what we had in the tank. Gas is pricier the farther away from the main cities you get ($4/ gallon near the lake, compared to $3.50/ gallon in Eugene). When we reached the tunnel at the halfway point, we found it closed for the night (at 8, and we got there at 8:30), to reopen at 6am because of construction. I wasn’t that worried, mostly because I am ignorant of directions, and because we have a GPS for instances like this, to direct us to alternative routes home. Unfortunately, this tunnel is the only way to get back to Eugene, without driving back the way we had come, towards Crater Lake, or to Bend (which was over an hour away, and then nearly 3 away from Eugene). So, when we were an hour and a half away from home, we had to consider our options. We tried to decide whether it would make more sense money-wise to try to get a room at an inn for the night, than having to buy another full tank of gas to get us to Bend and home. Because Austin had to work in the morning (not to mention all the hotels we passed were full), we attempted to track down a gas station, which isn’t easy when you’re driving through national forests. My car has a small gas tank. It can hold 10 gallons or so, and I fill it up when it hits 300 miles. We were on 270, and desperately trying to find a close gas station in the GPS. The closest were 30 miles away, and with dead cell phones we couldn’t look up the phone numbers in order to call to make sure they were open. We finally got the GPS to find a Shell that was 15 miles away, and we drove there, hoping that the un updated GPS wasn’t taking us to an old station that no longer existed, and hoping that this one would be open, if it existed. This was probably the scariest part of the adventure. If we had made it there and it had been closed, we would’ve had to sleep in the car until they opened in the morning, because we didn’t have enough gas to make it to any other stations. In a stroke of luck, they were open, and we filled up the tank and asked if there were any other way of getting home without going through the tunnel. The gas station attendant told us our options were to head for Bend, or to go down to the very southern tip of Oregon, near Medford, and to come up that way. We chose Bend, because we’ve driven through it before.
Forest roads at night are terrifying. We saw deer a few times, grazing at the edges of the forest near the road. The roads are unlit, so we drove with our brights on the whole way. Austin drove us to Bend, and we stopped at a Shari’s 24 hour diner. Austin and I had eaten all of our sandwiches on our hike, and were getting very hungry, especially knowing we wouldn’t be home for another few hours. I got hash browns (vegan eating on the road is very limited), and he had a bunch of breakfast food (he swapped the meat in a combo breakfast for pancakes). I took over driving home from Bend, and managed to get us home safely. For the first hour I was so nervous, there are deer signs everywhere, and elk signs as well. I’ve been in a car that’s collided with a deer, and I know the consequences. Hitting a deer in the middle of the night, in the woods, with no cell phones was not an option. I drove super cautiously. Luckily there weren’t too many other people on the roads so I could keep my brights on. By the time we made it back to Eugene (at 2 in the morning), I was more awake than when we left Bend (from all the singing, at least our iPod was charged fully), and feeling so thankful to have made it home safely. That was way more of an adventure than we were looking for.

Other than the unexpected longer trip home, the day was amazing, and to look back at it a month later I wish we had time to go on a trip like this again before the summer ends (minus the roadblock at the end, of course). Sadly, we probably won’t get to do a trip quite like this for a while.

Here is a great video Angel made of the trip.

Photos I took on the trip. (click image to view larger)
Stop along the way to Crater Lake The Long Road
First Look at Crater Lake Untitled
Snag
Foot Prints Wizard Island
Garfield Peak Food Stop and Photo Time
Snow
Wizard Island from Garfield Peak Phantom Ship from Garfield Peak
Crater Lake from Garfield Peak at 8054ft Valley South of Crater Lake from Garfield Peak
Angel and Garfeild
Rocks behind Garfield Peak Wild Succulent
Flowers Home Finally! With 2 dead cellphones, and a 5 hour detour to Bend, because cause a tunnel was closed do to construction for the night on the way home.

Here are some nice panoramas.(click image to view full panoramas larger)
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IMG_4280
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Angel’s Photos of Crater Lake (click image to view entire album)
Screen Shot 2012-09-10 at 12.44.02 PM

Photos From August

It has been a while since my last post. I have been really busy lately, with some trips, visitors, work, moving into a new place, and Angel’s birthday. Here are just a couple photos from the past couple weeks.

Angel at our awesome wrap around counter. The counter tops in our new home, handmade tile made by our landlords.
My new bike commute distance and time. It triples my old commute of .33miles. Now only if I didn't forget my lock and water bottle. Great road find today. An Ikea Table Top and Legs. It will work as well as a brand new one does.
The start of the Cargo Bike Roll Call. Cetma
Untitled
Carcassonne Waffle Sunday Instated at our new place
Just hanging up some shades. Just upgraded the RAM in Angels MacBook Pro.
A penguin @brettpond My KitchenAid all set up.
Angel won the first round of her new birthday present, Hive. Nice game of Hive outside.
Out for a ride in the park. Angel's Birthday Chocolate Pie from Sweet Life.
Angel with her pie. Those fries look and were perfect with the Bocas tonight.

July Bike Camping with Friends

Last week Angel and I went on our first camping trip of the summer. We haven’t had enough time since she got done with the school for summer. We went with two of our friends Tuesday night until Wednesday morning. This was a quick bike camping trip we spontaneously decided to do just days before. It was super fun. The weather called for some rain and thunder, and that is what we got. Even so, it was fun.

Due to the secret location of where we camped, I’m only going to post the elevation of what we did. There were some great hills with some gravel logging roads on the way home.
Bike Camping Trip July 17-18

We left Eugene late in the evening, just a couple hours before sunset. It was a nice ride through the country with some nice hills between here and where we camped. Right before we arrived at the camping location we started hearing some thunders. And right when we got there it started sprinkling, although that ended really fast and it didn’t rain anymore that night.
Bikes all ready for bike camping. Hans and Canten
Hans Angel
Canten Inside the tent.
The next morning one of our friends had to leave early to get back to work on time. So it was just 3 of us on the way home. We took our time because none of us had anything to get to that day. We took a longer way home, featuring some long down hill gravel roads where Angel ended up getting a rear flat tire at one point, which got patched up quickly. We got a nice strong bout of rain at one point, which let up quickly. And we only had a couple very small spouts of rain after that. We ended up coming across one of Oregon’s many covered bridges.
Tent in the morning. My good old Surly.
Short Stop Angel's Linus Mixte 3speed, she does so good with so few gears.
Hans doesn't like the rain. Angel's prepared with her rain cape.
Covered Bridge Inside the bridge.
Smooth roads. A stop for some fresh chipseal.Here is a 360° Photo from a clear cut along our route.
Bike Camping 360

Overall it was a great trip and ride. Angel did super well riding her Linus Mixte 3speed, climbing most the hills with no or very little (at least verbal) complaints. Hopefully soon we can get her something with more gears. I’m just trying to figure out what frame would be great for her right now. Hopefully doing an internally geared hub again like a Nexus or Alfine 8 or maybe even an Alfine 11. I’m sure she would appreciate it. It was a great trip, and I hope Angel and I can go on more trips like this before the end of the summer.

Here are Angels Photos:
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Is Krampus here to eat your children, or to just go for a bike ride?

First there was the Pugsley
Surly Pugsley
Featuring huge 26×3.7-3.8 tires, it was the birth of the “Fat Bike”. Named after Pugsley Addams if I were to guess.
Wednesday-and-Pugsley-Addams

I would hope it might have been named after something cuter like this.
Pug

Then there was the Moonlander.
Surly Moonlander

Featuring even wider 26×4.7 tires allow you to float over everything you could imagine. More likely named for the Lunar Rover because of the massive tires, & not the Moon Lander (Apollo Lunar Module).

LunarRover

Now they have a new one.
Introducing the Surly Krampus!!

Bike is features 29×3.0 tires, This is not a “Fat Bike” according to Surly(HERE), to them it’s a “29+“. I could imagine it might be known as a “Chubby Bike”. This tires are wider than any other 29in tires(larger sizes can be 2.1-2.3). This will be great for people who want a wider tire, but don’t want a truely “Fat Bike”, or want a a 29er with fatter tires.  This one is nicely named after Santa Claus’s helper Krampus, this lovely fellow.
Krampus
Hopefully the bike won’t be carrying you off and eating you for Christmas dinner.

Here are more photos of the Surly Krampus: One, Two, Three

I’ll admit I don’t mountain bike, but I love the idea of the Pugsley and would really like one for myself. I do tend to explore dirt and gravel trails with my LHT, 26×1.5 tires aren’t great for that, it would be a lot easier with wider tires & why not get a “Fat Bike” Maybe someday I will treat myself to one of these bikes.

Photo: Mid June – Early July

Here is a collection of photos I haven’t posted from Mid June to Early July. There are a lot of photos in here I like including fresh cookies, new bike tools, fun trips, and fireworks. Enjoy!

Toasted Nose and Watermelon I wish I had a carbon drive.
Present left by a friend New MKS Pedals for Angel's Bike
Fresh Chocolate Chipless Cookies for Me!!! Flower
Fire Truck on River Bike Path My New Playmobil Cyclist
Blonde Headed Girl Park Tool TS-2.2, Thank You, MC
Out for a ride. Nutcase Helmet Detail
Angel's New Keen Newport H2s Vegan Chocolate with Coffee Syrup
Untitled Homemade Sodas, Honeybush; Cucumber Genie; Cran-Marionberry
Moonlight Mash Little Fern
Sunset Over Fern Ridge Sunset Over Fern Ridge 2
Sunset Over Fern Ridge 3 180° View of the Firework from the Butte
Untitled Eugene from the Butte
Thank you to Jim Stein for all your help, and the excellent tool. Dinner
Club Nintendo Hanafuda Cards Club Nintendo Hanafuda Cards

HJ Andrews Experimental Forest

Last year in my Environmental Science Class at Chemeketa Community College our professor took us to H.J Andrews for a field trip. Angel did the same trip the year before with her sister when they took the class. Since then both Angel and I have wanted to go back together and explore. This past weekend, we got our chance.

H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest is located in the Cascade mountains just west of Blue River, Oregon. Covering 15,800acres (24.68mi2), the forest is administered cooperatively by the USDA Forest Service’s Pacific Northwest Research Station, Oregon State University, and the Willamette National Forest. The forest is used for research, including long term research, as well as education, but the public are welcome to come visit and hike select trails. There is some information you should know before tromping through the forest though. (Visitor Info) I don’t believe many people come out here to hike. Most people I talk to about it have never even heard of it, with longer and more extensive trails to bike in more well known parts of the Willamette National Forest just a couple miles down the road. At HJ there are two public use trails to hike. Lookout Creek Old-Growth Trail(3.5mi one way) goes along Look Out Creek through beautiful old-growth forest. Your other option is the Carpenter Mountain Lookout Trail (1.6mi), which is a short hike, that consists of stunning views of the forests of the Cascade Mountains and Wolf Rock.  There is a lot going on at HJ Andrews, if you are interested in finding out more please checkout their site and read about the wonderful and interesting research that is going on there, along with all the other interesting information. andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/ More links at the bottom of the page.

Angel and I hiked some of the lower Lookout Creek Old-Growth Trail, and I was able to try out my new camera mount for my GoPro that I made out of $12 worth of 7 feet of threaded PVC pipe. It helped to allow me to get higher and farther reaching camera views without unnecessarily crushing vegetation, in out of reach spots and in the water without freezing my hands off like I am used to. It worked out pretty well, I can’t wait to use it more on future adventures, hopefully more with clear water.

Here are the photos I took from our hike.
Look-Out Ridge at H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest Lookout Creek Old-Growth Trail at H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest
Bear Stump Large Stump
Weird Lichen Untitled
Another Large Stump Cornus canadensis, Canadian Dwarf Cornel, Canadian Bunchberry, Quatre-temps, Crackerberry
Fungi Deep in the trails
Log Bridge Log Stairs
Oplopanax horridum, Devil's Walking Cane, Devil's Walking Stick, Devil's Club Blue River Reservoir
Land Slide My new camera poll worked out pretty well on today's trip.

Here are some other links about HJ Andrews Experimental Forest:
Visitors, 2
Students and Teachers
Old Growth Virtual Tour
Creative Writers Collaboration
Forest Map Collection
PDF: HJ Andrews brochure
PDF: HJ Andrews Map, Backside
PDF: Lookout Creek Old-Growth Trail brochure
PDF: Max G. Geier, (1948-2000) Necessary Work: Discovering Old Forests, New Outlooks, and Community on the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest